The Health and safety law poster must be displayed on all business premises. The employer has a duty under the Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations (HSIER). The 1999 poster or leaflet must be replaced with the new poster or leaflet no later than 5 April 2014.

Source: HSE Website

Between 18 February and 15 March, inspectors will make unannounced visits to construction sites to ensure they are managing high-risk activity, such as working at height.

They will also check for general good order, assess welfare facilities and check whether suitable PPE such as head protection, is being used appropriately.

During 2011/12, 49 workers were killed while working in construction and 2,884 major injuries were reported. The purpose of the initiative is to remind those working in the industry that poor standards are unacceptable and could result in enforcement action.

Source: HSE website

Protectus Consulting can provide health and safety specialist to support your business in having a safe work environment. we can carry out a compliance review at regular intervals to ensure health and safety is implemented effectively. If you need to achieve CHAS accredited we can support you through this.

 

Healthcare workers are often affected by needlestick injuries, however other occupations are also affected. Protectus have prepared with support from local Tattooist companies a training course, specifically aimed at dealing with the Health, Safety and Environmental issues faced by professional tattoo artists and body piercing artists. Needlestick injuries may also affect carers and children picking up used needles.

  • For more details about our courses either contact us or follow the link:

http://cluster24748.website-staging.uk/protectus.co.uk/training/

  • If you prefer the self training method, then we have developed a specialist training pack available for instant download:

http://cluster24748.website-staging.uk/protectus.co.uk/store/presentation-download/

Our training material is certificated, so that you can demonstrate to your clients that you are competent and taking their care seriously.

Blood borne pathogens

The major blood-borne pathogens of concern associated with needlestick injury are hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV. However, other infectious agents also have the potential for transmission through needlestick injury, including:

  • Human T-lymphotropic retroviruses I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II).
  • Hepatitis D virus (HDV – or delta agent) which is activated in the presence of HBV.
  • GB virus C (GBV-C) – formerly known as hepatitis G virus (HGV).
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV).
  • Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).
  • Parvovirus B19.
  • Transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV).
  • West Nile virus (WNV).
  • Malarial parasites.
  • Prion agents such as those associated with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs).

Between 2002 and 2011, 4,381 significant occupational exposures were reported (increasing from 276 in 2002 to 541 in 2011).

72 significant occupational exposures reported between 2002 and 2011 involved ancillary staff. The majority of these exposures were due to non-compliance with standard infection control precautions for the handling and safe disposal of clinical waste.

Source: Health Protection Agency (HPA) report regarding healthcare workers, released in 2012.

The Health and Safety executive have provided a detailed COSHH bulletin SR12, this document provides essential reading and is relevant to the industry.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/guidance/sr12.pdf

Protectus Training

The Protectus Training course and self help pack provides information that helps employers (including the self-employed and franchisees) comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH). Demonstrate compliance to other relevant health and safety legislation and provide a safe working environment that minimises the risk of exposure.

We have compiled a short summary of the Health and Safety Considerations for Tattooists, attend our training and ensure compliance to all applicable law.

Main Legislation

The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, The Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1982.

Age restrictions

A person must be 18 years of age before they can have a tattoo. This is a statutory requirement, with criminal penalties on conviction.

Records keeping

The keeping of records protects both the client and the tattooist and therefore the following details should be included in client records:

  • Date of the procedure;
  • Client’s name, address and telephone number;
  • Full details of the procedure;
  • A record of the type of the procedure
  • Medical history.

When assessing medical history, as a minimum a health declaration form should ask for information and history. Please discuss with us what types of forms can be used, we are here to help and can provide email guidance on some matters free of charge. Please get in touch if you have a question.

 Typical Questions

Check and know the history before any procedure.

  • heart disease.
  • medication.
  • pregnancy/breast feeding.
  • blood borne viruses such as HIV, Hepatitis B and C.
  • low and high blood pressure, epilepsy, diabetes, impetigo etc.
  • skin conditions such as eczema, warts and psoriasis.
  • allergic responses to latex, anaesthetics and adhesive plasters.
  • Conditions that compromise the immune system.
  • Heart disease/pacemaker.
  • Haemophilia.

What should be considered before performing a procedure

  • The tattooist should discuss client’s medical history.
  • Where a condition exists, or there be past history, written authorisation from the client’s doctor should be required before tattooing takes place.
  • The tattooist should record the clients’ response to health history on the client’s record card and consent forms.
  • Remember also that Data Protection legislation applies.

http://cluster24748.website-staging.uk/protectus.co.uk/data-protection-act-2/

Essential equipment to conduct hygienic procedures

  • Alcohol impregnated swabs (pre packed) for skin preparation.
  • Autoclave.
  • Disinfectants, disposable caps or trays for pigments.
  • Disposable latex, vinyl or nitrile gloves may be worn, but must be discarded after each client (they must be disposed of as clinical waste).
  • Disposable razor, kidney dish (autoclavable container for needles), paper tissues and paper towels, sharps container.
  • Spray bottle containing fresh skin preparation antiseptic.

After care advice

  • It is best practice to give out written after care advice as clients are often nervous or excited about their new tattoo and may not take in verbal advice.
  • Basically the treated area must be covered with a lint free sterile gauze which is taped to the skin with micropore tape – this permits ventilation of the damaged skin surface, helping the healing process.
  • The new tattoo should be kept dry to prevent the onset of infection.

Other things to consider

  • The practitioner or the client should be under the adverse influence of drugs, alcohol or other substances.
  • Tattooing should be undertaken in conditions of appropriate privacy.
  • Eating, drinking and smoking should not be permitted in the studio.
  • Tattoo machines (motors and frames) cannot be sterilised and should be carefully damp wiped between clients with 70% alcohol.
  • Because needles are repeatedly dipped into pigments during tattooing, it is  important that fresh pigments are used for each customer.
  • Pigment capsules should be firmly placed in holders while in use, to avoid the possibility of spillage. These should be made of autoclavable material e.g. stainless steel and should be cleaned and disinfected between clients and sterilised between sessions.

Finding a competent practitioner

Tattooists should be registered to operate with the local authority and should display their registration certificate. If the practitioner intends to perform your tattoo without asking for your medical history or personal details such as name and address, this indicates bad practice.

Ask your practitioner for Health, Safety and Neddlestick awareness training and certification.

The work that Protectus have completed with Tattooists in the UK, we can assure you the profession is very serious about Health, Safety and the care of customers.

Corporate manslaughter cases rise.  Ensure your business attends awareness seminars and receives training, Protectus can support with legal requirements. The number of corporate manslaughter cases opened by the Crown Prosecution Service jumped by 40% last year as prosecutors stepped up their use of recent legislation that has produced just three convictions to date.

There were more than 60 new corporate manslaughter cases opened in 2012, up from 45 in 2011. There have been only a few convictions but there will more to follow as there are more than 30 other prosecutions yet to be heard.

Companies that cut health and safety expenditure to help survive the recession could leave themselves liable to prosecution in the event of an accident.

What should you do?

We have prepared a comprehensive overview of your legal responsibilities to Corporate Manslaughter and we are running a number of open seminars on the subject.

  1. Attend one of the seminar sessions: http://cluster24748.website-staging.uk/protectus.co.uk/contact/
  2. Download our latest presentation material: http://cluster24748.website-staging.uk/protectus.co.uk/store/presentation-download/
  3. Whatever you do, ensure you are legally compliant and have assessed the risks in your business.

We are here to support, so please get in touch.

What is the Corporate Manslaughter Act?

Prior to 6 April 2008, it was possible for a corporate entity, such as a company, to be prosecuted for a wide range of criminal offences, including the common law offence of gross negligence manslaughter. However, in order for the company to be guilty of the offence, it was also necessary for a senior individual who could be said to embody the company (also known as a ‘controlling mind’) to be guilty of the offence. This was known as the identification principle.

On the 6 April 2008, the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 (CMCHA) came into force throughout the UK. In England and Wales and Northern Ireland, the new offence is called corporate manslaughter, and in Scotland it is called corporate homicide.

The provisions in the Act which relate to deaths which occur in custody will be brought into force on 1 September 2011.  There is further information on these provisions later in this guidance.

Where any of the conduct or events alleged to constitute the offence occurred before 6 April 2008, the pre-existing common law will apply. Therefore, the Act will only apply to deaths where the conduct or harm, leading to the death, occurs on or after 6 April.  Therefore if the breach of duty is alleged to have occurred before 6 April 2008, for example where a building has been defectively wired or a person has been exposed to asbestos many years ago, the common law applies.

Individuals will not be able to bring a private prosecution for the new offence without the consent of the DPP (section 17).  This is unlike the position with allegations of gross negligence manslaughter against individuals where no such consent is required.  See below for further information regarding consent.

The offence was created to provide a means of accountability for very serious management failings across the organisation. The original intention was to overcome the problems at common law of ‘identification’ and ‘aggregation’ (the prosecution could not aggregate the failings of a number of individuals) in relation to incorporated bodies. The offence is now considerably wider in scope than simply overcoming these two problems and it now includes liability for organisations which could never previously be prosecuted for manslaughter.

The new offence is intended to work in conjunction with other forms of accountability such as gross negligent manslaughter for individuals and other health and safety legislation.

If you believe that you have an Asbestos problem in your business or handle Asbestos then please contact us or visit our Presentation download pages for the latest guidance.

http://cluster24748.website-staging.uk/protectus.co.uk/store/presentation-download/

 

For Further information regarding prosecution please visit the Crown Prosecution Service, There website is http://www.cps.gov.uk.

The law does not state a minimum temperature, but the temperature in workrooms should normally be at least:

  • 16°C, or
  • 13°C if much of the work is physical.

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 lay down particular requirements for most aspects of the working environment. Regulation 7 deals specifically with the temperature in indoor workplaces and states that:

‘During working hours, the temperature in all workplaces inside buildings shall be reasonable.’

However, the application of the regulation depends on the nature of the workplace, such as a bakery, a cold store, an office, a warehouse.

The associated ACOP ( Workplace health, safety and welfare. Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992. Approved Code of Practice) goes on to explain:

‘The temperature in workrooms should provide reasonable comfort without the need for special clothing. Where such a temperature is impractical because of hot or cold processes, all reasonable steps should be taken to achieve a temperature which is as close as possible to comfortable. ‘Workroom’ means a room where people normally work for more than short periods.

The temperature in workrooms should normally be at least 16 degrees Celsius unless much of the work involves severe physical effort in which case the temperature should be at least 13 degrees Celsius. These temperatures may not, however, ensure reasonable comfort, depending on other factors such as air movement and relative humidity.’

Where the temperature in a workroom would otherwise be uncomfortably high, for example because of hot processes or the design of the building, all reasonable steps should be taken to achieve a reasonably comfortable temperature, for example by:

  • insulating hot plants or pipes;
  • providing air-cooling plant;
  • shading windows;
  • siting workstations away from places subject to radiant heat.

Where a reasonably comfortable temperature cannot be achieved throughout a workroom, local cooling should be provided. In extremely hot weather fans and increased ventilation may be used instead of local cooling.

Where, despite the provision of local cooling, workers are exposed to temperatures which do not give reasonable comfort, suitable protective clothing and rest facilities should be provided. Typical examples of suitable protective clothing would be ice vests, or air/water fed suits. The effectiveness of these PPE systems may be limited if used for extended periods of time with inadequate rest breaks. Where practical there should be systems of work (for example, task rotation) to ensure that the length of time for which individual workers are exposed to uncomfortable temperatures is limited.

HSE previously defined thermal comfort in the workplace, as: ‘An acceptable zone of thermal comfort for most people in the UK lies roughly between 13°C (56°F) and 30°C (86°F), with acceptable temperatures for more strenuous work activities concentrated towards the bottom end of the range, and more sedentary activities towards the higher end.’

Source HSE Website,  Wikipedia

The “European Week for Safety and Health at Work” is held every October (w/c 21 October 2013). This event is held across the European Union and beyond. Seminars and meetings as part of this event for 2013 are scheduled to take place in France, London, New Zealand and many other countries. This campaign focuses on drawing together communities involved in Health and Safety in the form of workshops, conferences, exhibitions, training courses and advertising campaigns. All can participate in the campaign including big and small enterprises and individuals. A variety of activities take place throughout the year, during and after this week in October.

This event is one of EU-OSHA’s (European Agency for Safety and Health at Work) principal tools for raising awareness for Health and Safety at work. As well as holding the campaign, EU-OSHA supports businesses and other bodies who want to make aware their health and safety status and share best practice. Highlights of the event include the “Healthy Workplaces Good Practice Awards” competition which attracts entries from all organizations. It recognizes those that have strived to build innovative ways of good health and safety practices at the workplace. There is also the “Healthy Workplaces Closing Summits” where policy makers and health and safety professionals can network.

Looking closer to home, the annual “Health and Safety Expo” in Birmingham (held in May)  is Europe’s leading annual exhibition for showcasing the latest health and safety products on the market. The event also includes seminars and information sources. It gives people the opportunity to mingle, view and compare products on display. Organizations can also sell health and safety services. The exhibition includes markets ranging from the automotive to the food and beverage. The event is supported by Iosh and Rospa, among others.

There are of course, many other events and workshops out there, many run by the HSE and other professional bodies. These events provide a great networking opportunity for health and safety professionals, organizations and businesses who wish to promote their products and make aware their enterprises worldwide.

Sources: Osha, HSE, H&S Expo

Norovirus, better known as the winter vomiting bug, is the most common stomach bug in the UK, affecting people of all ages.

The virus, which is highly contagious, causes vomiting and diarrhea. As there is no specific cure, you have to let it run its course, but it should not last more than a couple of days. If you get norovirus, make sure you drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration and practise good hygiene to help prevent it from spreading.

Norovirus can be unpleasant to experience, but it’s not generally dangerous and most people make a full recovery within a couple of days, without having to see a doctor.

Noroviruses are a group of viruses that are the most common cause of stomach bugs in the UK. They are also known as small round structured viruses (SRSV) or Norwalk-like viruses.

Between 600,000 and 1 million people in the UK catch norovirus every year. You may have heard of it as the “winter vomiting bug” because the illness is more common in winter. However, the virus can be caught at any time of the year.

What should I do?

If you have norovirus, the following steps should help ease your symptoms:

  • Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration.
  • Take paracetamol for any fever or aches and pains.
  • If you feel like eating, eat foods that are easy to digest.
  • Stay at home and don’t go to the doctor, because norovirus is contagious and there is nothing the doctor can do while you have it.
  • However, contact your GP to seek advice if your symptoms last longer than a few days or if you already have a serious illness.

How to stop it spreading

The virus is easily spread by contact with an infected person, especially through their hands. You can also catch it through contaminated food or drink or by touching contaminated surfaces or objects.

The following measures should help prevent the virus from spreading further:

  • Wash your hands frequently.
  • Do not share towels and flannels.
  • Disinfect any surfaces that an infected person has touched.

Outbreaks in busy places such as hospitals, nursing homes and schools are common because the virus can survive for several days on surfaces or objects touched by an infected person.

If you want to know more about Norovirus, please visit the source of this Post at:

http://www.nhs.uk/

 

The tree lights

According to a UK Newspaper, a £10,500 electronic Christmas tree in County Durham had to be taken down due to the risk of somebody being electrocuted. The LED-tree had to be guarded overnight because of its 240v rating. This was particularly concerning as guidelines suggested a maximum voltage for an unsupervised public display of just 24v.

Looking closer to home, your tree lights should, of course, be tested by the manufacturer to comply with recognised standards  e.g. BS Kitemark. A visual scan for damaged wires or broken bulbs should be made. Of course, don’t put the tree near a water or heat source ie electric kettles or radiators.  And don’t use indoor lights outdoors. And keep the kids away. Avoid trailing flexes and overloaded sockets. Injuries include people falling while they’re putting them up, children swallowing the bulbs, and people getting electric shocks.

Maybe you shouldn’t go this far with your lights….gives one a headache…might cause cars to crash!

The tree itself

If not natural, the tree should be flame retardant. If you use a freshly cut tree, which you have standing in water, be careful to separate the bottom from any artificial lights on its branches.

According to the NHS, more than 80,000 people a year need hospital treatment for injuries such as falls, cuts and burns during Christmas time. Beware of your Christmas tree. That Norwegian spruce is not as innocent as it looks. Every year, about 1,000 people are injured by their tree, usually while fixing decorations, lights on to the higher branches.

Even Christmas decorations can cause accidents

About 1,000 people a year are hurt when decorating their homes. Children bite into glass baubles and adults fall while using unstable chairs instead of ladders to put up streamers…

Novelty decorations, such as stuffed Santas, reindeer and snowmen, which look like toys, may not comply with strict toy safety regulations. Therefore, they should not be within the reach of children.

Sources: NHS, RoSPA

 

 

November News

Hot topics :

  • First aid
  • Legislation changes