, , , , , , ,

Risk Assessment in the Workplace

Step 1: Identify the hazards

Walking around the workplace and communicating with everybody may help one become aware of the hazards not easily identified initially. Feedback from employees, visiting the HSE website for guidance, checking the manufacturers instructions for hardware and learning from the past, ie past recordings of risk etc may help identify hazards.

Step 2: Decide who might be harmed and how

For each hazard identified in Step 1, it must be clear who could be harmed  eg ‘people working in the storeroom’ or ‘passers-by’, rather than identification by individual names. There may be certain groups of people more at risk than others, for example, people with disabilities, expectant mothers, members of the public.

Step 3: Evaluate the risks and decide on precautions

Once the hazards have been identified, one must decide what to do about them. Legislation on good practice must be adhered and compared to in making continual changes to the safety within the workplace.

Step 4: Record your findings and implement them

A proper risk assessment would result in a proper check been made and queries about who might be affected and investigations done as required. Obvious significant hazards would be dealth with, taking into consideration the people that may be involved. The precautions would be reasonable and would almost eliminate risk, keeping it low at least. Involvement of staff and representatives ensure everybody is aware and complying with good safety procedures.

Step 5: Review your risk assessment and update if necessary

Protectus Consulting  provide full company Risk Assessments in all areas to ensure compliance with current legislation. Contact us today for a quote.

 

 

Sources and more information:  HSE Website

 

 

 

, ,

The Contractors Health and Safety Assessment Scheme (CHAS)

CHAS moved to annual assessments with effect from 1st October 2012, please call us if you require support for re-assessment.

What is CHAS

Assessing suppliers health and safety competence is a time consuming process. Suppliers can sometimes meet one buyer’s Health and Safety standards but not another. Being CHAS approved reduces duplication as suppliers compliance is accepted by all CHAS buyers.

CHAS assesses applicants:

  1. Health and safety policy statement;
  2. Their organisation for health and safety;
  3. Their specific health and safety arrangements to a standard acceptable to buyers and to others.

Background

In 1997 a group of health and safety and procurement professionals from across Great Britain worked with the Association of London Government (ALG) to develop CHAS. In 2001 CHAS became a web-based system.

CHAS started with two main aims.

  1. To improve health and safety standards across Great Britain.
  2. To reduce duplicated safety applications for both suppliers and buyers.

To date more than 500 public and private sector buyer organisations, such as councils, housing associations, NHS trusts, including a growing number of large private companies who employ sub-contractors, recognise CHAS.

CHAS Benefits:

Participating in the CHAS scheme helps both suppliers and buyers.

  1. Suppliers show compliance with health and safety law (the core criteria described in the CDM regulations).
  2. On achieving compliance a supplier is approved to work for all of CHAS’ buyers. (Some Buyers may require “Accredited” Status).
  3. Inconsistencies are reduced where some suppliers may be judged compliant by one buyer but not another.
  4. CHAS gives guidance on any weaknesses in a supplier’s safety management, including how they can improve.
  5. Being a CHAS supplier or buyer saves both time and resources.

For more information please call us to discuss.

,

Data Protection Act

[one_half]

Please Note:

Legislation documents posted to this site are for information and guidance purposes only. It is important that you check for latest issue documents.

Data Protection Act (Summary Information)

[/one_half][one_half last]

 

[/one_half]